The strikingly beautiful Kára McCullough, Miss D.C.- USA, waltzed across a Las Vegas stage last night and accepted, through the happiest of tears, the title of Miss USA.   The 25-year-old chemist who works at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission was crowned, re-sashed and handed a bouquet of flowers for her first official glide down the catwalk amidst cheers from the adoring crowd.  Elsewhere, liberals burst into tears as well—of anger and disbelief as another tragic event had befallen that would challenge the internal fortitude of the Progressives.

Are you making that weird face when confusion overrides decorum?  (the one your momma warned would freeze in perpetuity) Well, Miss McCullough made two egregious errors in the competition that should have rendered her participation null and void.  She spoke her mind on two issues; the first was in response to the ‘gotcha’ style questions that the pageant employs to keep the pretties’ realistic.

The first controversial ask was, “Do you think affordable health care for all U.S. citizens is a right or a privilege and why?”

“I’m definitely going to say it’s a privilege,” McCullough responded. “As a government employee, I am granted health care. And I see firsthand that for one to have health care, you need to have jobs. So, therefore, we need to continue to cultivate this environment that we’re given the opportunities to have health care as well as jobs to all the American citizens worldwide.”

That was the part of the program where the liberals started to pay attention.  Normally, our progressive friends are not fond of beauty contests–because they objectify women and all that nonsense.  But this one was starting to spark interest with Miss McCullough at the microphone.  With hopes to redeem McCullough, who must have misspoke, the lefties attempted to have McCullough absorb a prudent, politically correct stance, through the airwaves and osmosis.  Yeah, that did not happen, as the second question, near and dear to our feminist friends asked for a definition of feminism, and if McCullough considers herself a feminist:

 “So as a woman scientist in the government, I’d like to lately transpose the word feminism to equalism,” McCullough said as members of the audience cheered. “I don’t really want to consider myself — try not to consider myself like this die-hard, you know, like, ‘Oh, I don’t really care about men.’ But one thing I’m gonna say, though, is women, we are just as equal as men when it comes to opportunity in the workplace.”

She walks, she talks, and she thinks!  And the mean and angry birds began to flap their wings tweeting their angst through the ether, seeking love, approval, and acceptance, as they bemoaned both beauty and brains.

But Terrance Jenkins, the actor and co-host of the event may have hit on the exact reason McCullough rose to the top of the beauty pile-up, “If you would have been my science teacher, I would have paid more attention in class!” And maybe you would’ve been a nuclear chemist too, instead of hanging with the Kardashians.  Just a thought, Terrance.

McCullough is precisely the woman to represent America in this time of great change and opportunity.  A nuclear chemist who values hard work with reward is an appropriate spokesperson for girls in our country, and worldwide, who want to challenge the norm and step into fields of science, technology and math (STEM)—which are still professions dominated by men.  Last time I checked, feminists were touting women who had broken the barriers in these vocations, but maybe adding in the drop dead gorgeous appearance of a beauty queen was just too much‘progression’ to process.

Sarah Cowgill

National Correspondent at Liberty Nation
Sarah has been a writer in the political and corporate worlds for over 25 years. As a sought-after speech writer, her clients included CEO's, U.S. Senators, Congressmen, Governors, and even a Vice President. She’s worked as Contributing Editor at Scottsdale Life, a news reporter for the Journal and Courier, and guest opinion political writer for numerous publications nationwide. A born storyteller, Sarah has published a full-length book and is currently finishing a quirky, sarcastic, second novel.